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James Page Completes HAZWOPER Training

Dec 10, 2012

Brockington is pleased to announce that James Page, a crew chief in our Atlanta office, has successfully completed a 40-hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) training course in compliance with Federal OSHA Regulation 29 CFR 1910.120(e).  HAZWOPER training is usually obtained by workers who clean up hazardous waste sites, such as those on the EPA's National Priorities List, but it can also be an important training tool for archaeologists.

As explained in William White III's article in the Winter 2011 Society for Historic Archaeology Bulletin, titled "The Legacy of Industrialization: Archaeology at Contaminated Sites with Potentially Hazardous Artifacts," many items regularly encountered by archaeologists can also be dangerous if mishandled. Hazardous artifacts can include historic medicine vials, asbestos, and historic fragrance bottles with benzene.  Having completed an approved HAZWOPER course, Mr. Page is better able to advise Brockington archaeologists and laboratory staff in identifying and properly handling potentially toxic artifacts and materials, and when it is necessary to contact a specialist.


Brockington's November Community Service Efforts

Dec 04, 2012

In an effort to support worthy causes as well as promote company cohesion, Brockington supported the following organizations during the month of November:

The Paideia School
The VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars)
Operation Santa
American Red Cross
Movember (Men's Health Awareness)
Elizabethtown KY Heritage Council
The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation
Meals on Wheels


USACE South Atlantic Division Administrative History

Dec 04, 2012

In 2012, Brockington and Associates completed A History of the South Atlantic Division of the US Army Corps of Engineers. Building on the work of three unpublished histories, the project chronicled the history of SAD during an extremely active period.  Legislation passed after World War II jump-started the rapid growth and modernization of the Southeast. The massive multiple-purpose reservoirs that provide hydropower, flood risk reduction, navigation, water supply and recreation to the people of the region were built in the 1950s and ‘60s, and contributed significantly to economic development. At the same time, SAD provided design, construction, and real estate support to the high concentration of military facilities in the region.  The post-war period also encompasses the rise of environmental awareness and a conscious effort on the part of the nation and the Corps to adopt a balanced philosophy of environmental values and benefits.  South Atlantic Division has also contributed management support to a variety of other in-country and overseas US agencies and international organizations, including disaster relief, emergency management, and military contingency operations. To complete this comprehensive history, a team of Brockington historians conducted primary and secondary research at archival repositories and agency offices. In addition, the project also involved an oral history component including interviews with both active and retired managers and several former SAD Commanders at various locations in the southeast.  


Ben Roberts to Chair a Cultural Heritage by AIA-Military Panel Roundtable

Dec 04, 2012

At the 2013 meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA), Ben Roberts, a Captain in the Georgia National Guard and a veteran of the Iraq War, as well as a Brockington historian and GIS specialist, will be chairing a roundtable discussion at the Cultural Heritage by AIA-Military Panel (CHAMP) Workshop. The purpose of CHAMP is to support the military through close partnerships with many military and academic constituencies to provide cultural heritage education and training, good policy guidelines, good cultural resource tools, and scholarly advice about sites and artifacts. This workshop will address these issues and determine the best practices for aiding the military in preserving cultural heritage.

Mr. Roberts will be leading a roundtable discussion on developing contingency plans for immediate implementation, within 60-90 days, whenever crises occur.  The goal of the roundtables is to work towards resolving all the remaining action items from the previous year's workshop, as well as developing new action items for the coming year.

Given his level of expertise and experience in both the military and CRM, Mr. Roberts is sure to lead an interesting and successful discussion of the extremely important topic of cultural resource emergencies in a military setting. The 2013 AIA conference is scheduled for January 3-6 in Seattle, Washington.


Charleston Office Members Attend Preservation of Historic Roads Training

Nov 19, 2012

Josh Fletcher, Senior Archeologist, and Charles Philips, Senior Historian, from the Charleston Office attended a National Preservation Institute course, Preservation Planning and Policy Development for Historic Roads, in Tallahassee, Florida Nov. 16, 2012. The course explored new tools and techniques being used to identify, preserve and manage historic roadways. 

Pictured at Right: The NPI course covered the evaluation of historic roadways as well as good planning and management practices that help to preserve resources like Florida Route 13, the William Bartram Scenic and Historic Highway, in St. Johns County, Florida.


Serving the Southeast: A History of the Southeastern Power Administration, 1990-2012

Nov 19, 2012

Established on March 21, 1950 with headquarters in Elberton, Georgia, the Southeastern Power Administration (SEPA) is one of four power marketing administrations (PMAs) within the United States Department of Energy. Each PMA, authorized by congressional legislation, is charged with marketing hydroelectric power produced at federal dams operated by the US Army Corps of Engineers or Bureau of Reclamation within a specific geographic region. By statute, the PMAs must give preference to public utility bodies and cooperatives, selling the power at the lowest rate consistent with sound business principles. Today, the electricity produced at federal impoundments accounts for approximately one-half of the hydroelectricity produced in the United States. Marketed by the PMAs, this hydroelectricity currently serves 60 million Americans in 34 states.  In the Southeast, SEPA currently markets federal power from 22 Corps-owned hydroelectric projects to 491 preference customers across 11 states, reaching over 12 million power consumers. Completed in 2012, Serving the Southeast documented the recent history of this small, but powerful federal agency which maintains a staff of just over 40 full-time employees. The history included a study of recent organizational changes, the transition to modern technology, new energy policies for industry de-regulation and non-discriminatory transmission, as well as the effects of drought, the Tri-State Water Wars litigation, and aging hydroelectric equipment.    


Brockington's Atlanta Office Supports the Georgia Trust

Nov 16, 2012

One of the November community service initiatives for the Atlanta office was supporting The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation at the annual Uptown Rhodes Race 5K. Brockington employees participated in the race and served as race volunteers. The family-friendly event meandered through Ansley Park, one of Atlanta's most historic and beautiful neighborhoods. Sally Brockington and her husband Ed, their son Henry, and Ed's mom Barb participated in the race, while Rachel Bragg and Cat McBee manned the water station. After the event, they returned to The Georgia Trust's headquarters at Rhodes Hall for refreshments.

Pictured from left to right: Rachel, Cat, Barb (Medal Winner!), Ed, and Sally


Brockington Archaeologist Gives Presentation at Pensacola Archaeological Society

Nov 13, 2012

Kad Henderson is presenting his research on the Spanish Frigate Nuestra Señora del Rosario y Santiago Apostol at the meeting of the Pensacola Archaeology Society to be held Tuesday, November 13. An abstract of his presentation is provided below.

Mahogany and Iron: Archaeological Investigations of the Late 17th-Century Frigate Nuestra Señora del Rosario y Santiago Apostol

    Constructed prior to 1696 near Veracruz, Mexico, the Nuestra Señora del Rosario y Santiago Apostol was a powerful warship of the Spanish Armada de Barlovento. The ship served primarily as an escort vessel during its nine years at sea.  In addition to its primary duties Rosario led anti piracy patrols and fought in campaigns against other European powers in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. The ships career came to an end in September of 1705 during a powerful hurricane in Pensacola Bay, Florida. Excavations by the University of West Florida from 1998-2002 revealed very well preserved hull structure as well as thousands of artifacts. The wreck of the Rosario represents a unique resource for understanding Spanish colonial shipbuilding techniques in the late 17th-century as well as the lives of the individuals that built and sailed these vessels.


Brockington Employees Support the 3rd Annual Lowcounty American Indian Expo

Nov 09, 2012

The 3rd annual Lowcountry American Indian Expo, organized by the Morgan Allen Platt Foundation and held at Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site on November 1-2, 2012, gave 2,000+ elementary and middle school students an opportunity to learn about Native American culture and lifeways. During a 1-hour tour, students observe and participate in Native dancing and drumming, Indian hunting techniques, stone tool manufacture, Native foodways, archaeology, and an obstacle course/Native games. Brockington’s Eric Poplin serves on the Expo organizing committee, and presented the introduction to archaeology during the event. Josh Fletcher and Charlie Philips assisted with set-up and Josh served as photographer for a selected class as they toured this year’s Expo venues.


Brockington Supports the Mount Pleasant, South Carolina Land Conservancy

Nov 08, 2012

On November 4, 2012, Carol Poplin, Eric Poplin, and Josh Fletcher attended the 3rd Annual Golden Nugget Paddle n’ Party at Shem Creek and set up the Brockington booth on the boardwalk along the creek. The event was a benefit for the Mount Pleasant Land Conservancy. The mission of the Mount Pleasant Land Conservancy is to enhance the quality of life in Charleston County by preserving natural spaces within its urban and rural communities. This includes wetlands, sensitive upland property, scenic vistas and public spaces such as parks. They primarily seek to protect green space through voluntary donated conservation easements that include anything from larger tracts of land to a single signature tree. The event included blind auctions, great food and drinks from local vendors, a band playing from atop a big boat, and of course, 5K and 10K paddleboard races that took competitors from Shem Creek out into the Charleston Harbor. Lots of people stopped by the Brockington booth and the koozies and chapsticks were a big hit!


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